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Archive for July, 2009

The Landrush Period for the .CM (Cameroon) domain name extension began Wednesday July 15, 2009 at 0:00:01 UTC and will last until Friday July 31st at 0:00:01 UTC. Since this domain name extension is very similar to the .COM extension, Safenames is recommending that brand holders who missed the Trademark application process, submit a landrush request for their domains to protect their brands and their Web traffic. Safenames suggest that all landrush orders be placed with us by Thursday July 30th to ensure that your Landrush request(s) is added to our submission list. .CM Landrush requests are $460 per domain name and you will receive a 2 year registration if you are the only applicant for the name. If there is more than one applicant for the domain name, the name will be placed into an auction shortly after the Landrush Period has ended. The applicant with the highest bid for the domain name will be awarded the registration. Safenames will provide guidance on the .CM auction process if the domain name(s) you requested is schedule for auction.

To submit a Landrush order or ask a question about .CM, please contact a Safenames domain consultant.

http://www.safenames.net/AboutUs/ContactUs.aspx

Safenames has received its accreditation to provision domain names directly from the registries of three additional countries: Uganda, Romania and Angola. This allows Safenames’ customers to protect and promote their brand(s) by registering .ug, .ro and .co.ao extensions with Safenames. Of special note, Safenames is the first and, currently, the only registrar for NIC-Angola.

As experts in registry rules and registration regulations, Safenames will work directly with the NIC authorities to simplify the process to secure the domain name(s) your company needs. For more information, please contact a Safenames Domain Specialist.

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